Here’s a Wat, There’s a Wat, Everywhere’s a Wat in Bangkok, Thailand

Bangkok

The Half Day Bangkok Temples Tour by Destination Services Thailand is a great way to see some of the most famous wats in Bangkok.

Wat Traimit

Wat Traimit, the temple of the Golden Buddha, houses a 9.8 feet tall, 5.5 ton solid gold Buddha. Originally the Buddha located in Wat Phrayakrai, was covered in plaster and colored glass to hide the gold from Thailand invaders. Almost 200 years later in 1955, the Buddha was relocated to Wat Traimit. During the move the plaster was cracked revealing a solid gold statue. 

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Bangkok

Bangkok

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Wat Pho

Wat Pho, also known as the Reclining Buddha, is one of the oldest and largest wats in Thailand. This 150 feet long, 49 feet high statue of Buddha entering nirvana, the pose of the sleeping lion, barely fits in the temple.

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Buddha’s feet measure nearly 10 feet high and 14.7 feet long. A chakra is located at the center of each foot surrounded by 108 positive Buddha symbols.

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108 bronze bowls, representing the 108 positive symbols of Buddha, line the corridor of Wat Pho. Dropping a donation into each of the bowls is believed to be good luck. The donations are collected by monks and used to maintain the wat.

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There are 24 rock gardens throughout the Wat Pho complex with statues of yoga and traditional Thai massage poses.

Bangkok

Bangkok

The school of Traditional Thai Medicine and Massage is believed to be the earliest public education center in Thailand. The marble illustrations of pressure points used in massage are recognized by the UNESCO. Thai Medicine and Massage is still taught at the temple. Visitors can schedule massages and classes at the school. 

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A tower with a statue representing 1 of the 4 cardinal points is located at each corner of the courtyard (left).
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There are about 400 Buddhas from various time periods in Phra Rabiang.

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Wat Benchamabophit

Wat Benchamabophit, also known as the marble temple, is constructed with white marble imported from Italy. The temple contains 52 Buddha statues.

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Two lions guard the entrance to the marble temple.

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Bells line the courtyard of the marble temple. Ringing all 108 is believed to be good luck.

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Wat Bang Kung

Southwest of Bangkok in Samut Songkhram, Wat Bang Kung, dates back to 1765. Once a military camp, the temple is now completely covered by a Banyan tree. Near the temple is a Muay Thai training facility with statues displaying more than 30 poses.

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For good luck after visiting Wat Bang Kung, we feed the catfish in front of the temple.  Fishing of the unluck catfish is allowed behind the temple. 

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Learn about the 5 rules of a Buddhist monk and tips for visiting wats in: What to know about Wats and Bangkok.


September 2018

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Author: The Traveling Gingerbread

My fiancé, Mitch, and I have been traveling together over four years. Living and working full-time in Pittsburgh, PA, we travel as much as our vacation days and finances allow. We cram each adventure with activities, tours, and experiences to maximize our time. Any time we travel, we try to visit to a local brewery and can't walk by an Irish pub without stopping in for a pint of Guinness. 
 In Tokyo, we laughed every time we saw someone talking on their large, animated phone case. We had to buy one. Having an obsolete IPhone 5, the selection was limited. We purchased a gingerbread off a neglected rack in Shinjuku, Tokyo and The Traveling Gingerbread was born. You can purchase your own adorable gingerbread friend here! The Traveling Gingerbread is an entertaining account of our travels, fun facts, and tips we learned along the way.

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